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Squid Game: Netflix forced to edit scene in hit gory thriller as huge error exposed

Squid Game official trailer from Netflix

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Squid Game is on track to become Netflix’s biggest original series of all time as the hyper-violent South Korean thriller has enjoyed huge success since its debut on the small screen. However, fans of the show who plan to rematch the series will notice something is missing from one of the episodes.

In the first episode, Seong Gi-hun (played by Lee Jung-jae) is given a business card by a mysterious figure on the subway.

Unbeknown to Netflix at the time of filming, the number shown on the card was a real one.

The owner of this phone number has received thousands of calls since the show debuted.

“After Squid Game aired, I have been receiving calls and texts endlessly, 24/7, to the point that it’s hard for me to go on with daily life,” the phone number owner said.

Read more: Squid Game: Player 212’s hidden message you missed

“This is a number that I’ve been using for more than ten years, so I’m quite taken aback. 

“There are more than 4,000 numbers that I’ve had to delete from my phone and it’s to the point where due to people reaching out without a sense of day and night due to their curiosity, my phone’s battery is drained and turns off.”

“At first I didn’t know why, but my friend told me that my number came out in Squid Game and that’s when I realised,” the phone number’s owner told Money Today via Koreaboo.

Netflix has now decided to edit the number to prevent further calls.

The screening giant told ABC: “Together with the production company, we are working to resolve this matter, including editing scenes with phone numbers where necessary.”

In the series, Seong enters the gory challenge after playing a game with the business card owner. 

It appears curious viewers were calling the number to see if Squid Game is based on a true story.

Within 10 days of release, the series has taken the number one spot in 90 countries. 

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Squid Game sees people who are heavily in debt challenged to play a series of games which could see them win 45.6bn won (around £28m).

The contestants have to play a series of children’s games and beat 455 other people to win the money.

Discussing the show’s popularity, director Hwang Dong-hyuk said: “We did target a global audience from the start, but this fever wasn’t anything I had expected. I mean, who could have?”

He continued: “I believe that the characters, their stories and the problems they confront not only reflect the reality and the issues of South Korean society but also those of my own.”

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“The games and how the players play and react in them is what I used to do with my friends in my childhood,” he explained.

“This work contains everything from my 50 years of life – memories, experiences, families and friends; all the characters’ names come from my friends, including Seong Gi-hun. Thus, this work is personal and Korean.

“But I was certain that, at the same time, they are similar experiences, memories and feelings that everyone around the world can share. 

“We have all once indulged ourselves in the games and now, all grown up, we are growing weary from the big game of survival.”

Squid Game is available to stream on Netflix. 

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